Highly Recommended – Jane Lewis with Jason LaPrade, Piano-Based Folk/Pop/Roots, Uncorked, Saturday, Feb 14 at 8 pm

Valentine’s Day Special Event

Canadian singer-songwriter Jane Lewis has a style of music that blends engaging melodies and well-crafted lyrics. Her new album, Stay With Me, was released in September 2014.

Lewis has often been compared to Carole King, playing piano-based music that draws on her strength as a lyricist and singer. Musically, she covers a wide ground, from singer-songwriter ballads to groove-based songs with 60s classic pop flavour.

Her writing has been described as “intelligent, poetic, cinematic, and passionate.”

Lewis still claims “singing harmony” as one of her favourite things to do. When not at centre stage, she can be found leading vocal workshops (including “how to sing harmony”), singing backup vocals for other artists, leading community singalongs in her hometown of Guelph, Ontario, or running Women’s Music Weekend retreats.

A published author and editor, Jane shifted careers to pursue music full time in 2009. “My career evolution has been pretty organic,” she says, “but I’ve always been drawn to the creative side of things. It can make life unpredictable, but that’s just part of the adventure. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.”

Joining her will be in-demand dobro accompanist Jason LaPrade, a musical force in his own right.

Jason’s uniquely clear, expressive style on dobro, guitar, and lapsteel has won admiration and praise from the “old guard” of Canadian folk music, as well as from many dynamic, up-and-coming artists. He is a sought-after session musician, performing on albums for the likes of award-winning instrumentalist Oliver Schroer, stellar singer-songwriter Rosemary Phelan, two time CCMA winners The Stellas, star-studded band The Great Atomic Power, and popular alt-country band The Jayne Waynes.jane lewis jason

David Lum and The Hazy Maidens, Folk Roots and Pop, Uncorked, Thursday, Feb 12 at 7 pm

david lum

David Lum

Born and raised in Vancouver, David began his musical career as an instrumentalist for other artists and has developed into a gifted songwriter in his own right. Compassionate and spiritual, his intimate voice will draw you into his world, filled with tales of quiet desperation, longing and the triumph of the human spirit.

Infusing a blend of folk/pop influences with a touch of bluegrass, his versatile guitar style and songwriting is a result of many years of studio and performance experiences. His previous bands have played at various folk festivals in BC (Mission Folk Festival, Winter Roots Festival, Sunshine Folk Festival), opening for such acclaimed artists as Mae Moore, Stephen Fearing and Wyckham Porteous. As a solo artist, he has performed at the Back Forty Festival (Morden, Manitoba), the Trout Forest Music Festival (Ear Falls, Ontario) and the Winterfolk Roots and Blues Festival (Toronto, Ontario).

He also performs with Guelph’s The Hazy Maidens: Amy McCann, Julie McCann – they sound like kindred spirits; voices intertwined in harmony, instruments woven together in musicality and a fusion of energy & interconnection.  They are those friends each of us have had… the friend you had all your firsts with, the friend who knew you better than you knew yourself.  Their music is infused with their history & lifelong friendship. Once you hear their 3-part harmonies & lush sound, these are friends you’ll want to keep.

Neil Cotton & Hawk’s Nest, Country, Hillsview Active Living Centre, Friday, Feb. 13 at 7 pm, $25

An evening of musical history of the country music revolution of Outlaw Country, including some of your favourites – Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson Merle Haggard, Hank and others.neil c

Your $25 tickets includes entertainment, two drinks, snacks, refreshments and ALLTHE DANCING YOU CAN DO!

Need to sell 50 tickets by Feb 9 for this event to run. Open to the public. Pick up your ticket at reception.

Recommended – Fundraising Dance, The Wheat Kings (Tragically Hip Tribute Band), Nashville North, Friday, Feb. 13, 8 p.m., $20

Neighbours Holding Fundraiser Dance for Georgetown Couple

Life has been tough for the Jesus family of Georgetown for the past three years.

Rob Jesus was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor at the age of 38. Shortly after the diagnosis in March 2012 he underwent surgery to remove as much of the tumour as possible, followed by radiation, then chemotherapy to shrink what was left.

The treatment worked for a while, but by January 2013 the tumour was active again. Rob’s wife Sharon said they started him on Avastin— a costly drug that attacks the blood vessels surrounding the tumour. Fortunately it has been keeping the tumour stable, but it has many negative side effects.

The cost of Avastin‑—$12,600 a month in Rob’s case— is covered by some other provincial plans but not in Ontario, Sharon said. Currently most of the cost of the drug is being paid by Sharon’s benefit plan, and the drug manufacturer’s patient assistance program is covering the remainder.

But Sharon is concerned that her benefit company’s coverage could change and it would no longer pay for the drug. Rob, who is also on a multitude of other medications, has not been able to work since the diagnosis (he was an oil/lube technician in Milton) and his company did not have a long-term disability plan.

Due to stress and caring for her husband Sharon has been on medical leave from her job as a business consultant for Bell Canada. The couple, who live on Argyll Rd. have three children— aged 14, 10 and 5— and since Rob became ill they have struggled to deal with several medical related expenses as well as household maintenance costs, including having to replace a leaking roof and contend with a flood in their living room.

To help alleviate some of the financial pressure a group of concerned neighbours have organized a Valentine’s Fundraiser Dance featuring The Wheat Kings (a Tragically Hip cover band) to be held Friday, Feb. 13, 8 p.m. at Nashville North. All money raised will go to the Rob and Sharon Fund.

Kit Andrew, owner of Nashville North, was happy to offer the club at no charge for the event and is also covering the cost of hiring the band. He said there will be no costs to the fundraising committee for the dance.

Andrew can relate to the struggles the family is having as he underwent brain surgery a couple years ago for a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM). He too was off work for some time and he said it caused him “financial concern” as well. While it’s difficult for them to accept help, Sharon said she doesn’t “know how to put into words” how grateful she is that her neighbours have decided to host the fundraiser for them.

Tickets for the dance, which will also include a silent auction, raffles and door prizes, are $20 and available at https://www.facebook.com/RobandSharonFund, by calling 416-930-5261, or emailing lynasinteriors@cogeco.ca. Tickets will also be available at the door if they are not sold out.

Monetary donations can be made at http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/rob-and-sharon-fund/273406, which is a link that can also be found on the Facebook page.

Anyone who has items to donate for the silent auction, raffle or door prizes is asked to call 416-930-5261

fundraiser

Highly Recommended – The Bombadils, “Chamber Folk”, Uncorked on Main, Friday, February 13 at 8 pm

 The outstanding Bombadils are returning to Georgetown, following on the heels of Sarah Frank and Luke Fraser’s January visit to Uncorked on Main.

The Bombadils’ local Home Routes house concert was the finest I have seen and heard. Wonderful, highly cohesive music!

The Bombadils are a four piece folk ensemble that first connected in Montreal, QC, at McGill University over a shared curiosity surrounding the Celtic and Bluegrass traditions. Sarah Frank (fiddle, banjo, vocals), Luke Fraser (guitar, mandolin, vocals), Alan Mackie (bass, vocals), and Anh Phung (flutes, harmonica, vocals) were raised Canada­-wide and trained in classical performance and modern improvisation. Endearingly described by those closest to them as “Chamber Folk”, The Bombadils have been bringing music and high spirits to festivals, folk clubs, and forests since 2009, allowing diverse influences to flow naturally through their compositions, arrangements and improvisations.

“The Bombadils have all the elements of a great band – a high level of musical proficiency, deep respect for the traditional roots of their material and an engaging repertoire which holds the attention of the listener from beginning to end.”

Amy Gajadhar, Canadian Folk Music magazine

 

Nathan Rogers, Folk, HomeRoutes House Concert, Saturday, February 7 at 8 pm, $25

nathan rNathan Rogers, son of Canadian legend Stan Rogers, performs on Saturday, February 7 at 8 p.m. at the home of host Frank Loreto. For tickets, $25, you can reach Frank at: loreto@sympatico.ca

Some say he was born into it, some that he was born with it, while others claim he has earned it. With one foot planted firmly in folk music’s traditional roots and the other reaching into its dynamic future, Nathan Rogers isn’t entirely sure what ‘it’ is; singer, songwriter, guitarist, throat-chanter, percussionist, revivalist, or innovator. Whatever it may be, “Nathan has the ability to turn the folk world on its ears.”

Like many, it all started at home but what a unique home it was. Nathan’s first experience picking up the guitar was an attempt to copy the challenging riffs his brother David created after studying with celebrated virtuosos Don Ross and Preston Reed. His sister Beth demanded perfection in all vocals as any self-exacting classical voice teacher would, while his mother initiated him into the business side of the music industry. His father and uncle informed both his writing style and an ethos of Canadian people that shines in his lyrics.

While others were hiding their braces behind their hands, Nathan was already up high on stages of all sorts. In winter, he traveled with and won solo vocal awards as part of the Appleby Boys Choir. Summers were saved for his first love – appearances at folk festivals and the opportunity to meet, perform with and learn from outstanding musicians. Before he even had an album in hand, Nathan’s reputed vocal ability had him singing on stage with such notables as JP Cormier, The Oysterband, Spirit of the West, John Cameron, Connie Kaldor and James Keelaghan.

With a degree in comparative religion, an award winning voice and two prized Laskin guitars under his belt, Nathan founded his own record label, Halfway Cove Music. In 2005 he finally released his debut album, True Stories. Produced by Rick Fenton (former AD of Winnipeg Folk Festival), distributed by Festival and studded with such outstanding roots musicians as Nikki Mehta, JP Cormier, and Murray Pulver, True Stories was met with critical acclaim both at home and abroad. If multiple encores at every show are any indication, Canadian audiences coast-to-coast seem to like it too.

Nathan’s performance style leaves the audiences wondering where the rest of the band is hiding. Singing, chanting, playing the guitar and stomping, he fills any stage with “magnificent powerfully clear lyrics and arrangements.” Described as ‘intelligent and witty’, Nathan will ‘move men and women to tears with his sound and conviction.”

Nathan continues to earn his place in the Canadian folk and blues canon. As Fenton noted, “I have never seen any musician Nathan’s age who works so hard on his singing and guitar playing.”.

Nathan has recently become an adept throat singer, specializing in the Tuvan and Mongolian styles. A cultural tour-de-force in his own right, Nathan now brings a uniquely eastern flavour to a western tradition.

Nathan’s new album, “The Gauntlet” is available on Borealis Records and has met with very positive critical review.